Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Professor Tim Flannery to lead a special expedition cruise to Melanesia in 2017

#expeditioncruising


Internationally acclaimed scientist, explorer and conservationist, Professor Tim Flannery will be escorting a one-off trip discovering the secrets of Melanesia with World Expeditions in October 2017.

Professor Flannery has been described by renowned naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough as being "in the league of the world's all time great explorers".

A prolific author and prominent climate change activist, Flannery has undertaken many expeditions throughout Papua New Guinea where he's discovered numerous species and subspecies of mammal and studied the climate change affects on amphibians.

He'll share his extensive scientific knowledge of Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, along with his passion for exploration and discovery, on the 14-day Melanesia Discoverer tour regaling the 50 passengers on board the delightful Spirit of Enderby.

Melanesia Discoverer with Tim Flannery (8 - 21 October 2017):

Uncover the hidden gems of Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Sail through the turquoise waters of Melanesia where new vistas and unexpected encounters await. Travel at your own pace, with plenty of opportunities for landings, village visits, kayaking and snorkelling. These waters offer some of the greatest marine diversity in the world and for "birders" this itinerary offers sightings of rare species on remote islands where few have been before. The uniqueness of this trip coupled with Tim's knowledge and passion for this region will ensure this journey will be a once in a lifetime experience. From USD$6,995 per person (triple cabin).

More information at www.worldexpeditions.com or 1300 720 000.


About Professor Tim Flannery:

Professor Flannery is an internationally acclaimed scientist, explorer and conservationist, as well as prolific author and prominent climate change activist.

Tim has published more than 140 peer-reviewed scientific papers and has named 25 living and 50 fossil mammal species. His 32 books include the award winning The Future Eaters and The Weather Makers, which has been translated into over 20 languages.  While his books Mammals of New Guinea and the co-authored Prehistoric Mammals of Australia and New Guinea are still the most comprehensive reference works on these subjects to date. He has made numerous documentaries and regularly reviews for the New York Review of Books.

He received a Centenary of Federation Medal and in 2002 delivered the Australia Day address. In 2005 he was named Australian Humanist of the Year and in 2007 Australian of the Year.  In 2011 he was made a Chevalier of the Order of St Charles.

In 1998-9 he was a visiting professor at Harvard, and is a founding member of the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists, a director of the Australian Wildlife Conservancy, and has served on the International Board of WWF. In 2014 he joined the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute as Honorary Professor.

In 2007 he co-founded and was appointed Chair of the Copenhagen Climate Council. In 2011 he became Australia's Chief Climate Commissioner, and in 2013 he founded and heads the Australian Climate Council. He also serves on the Sustainability Advisory Board of Tata Power (India).

Tim has undertaken many expeditions throughout Papua New Guinea where he's discovered numerous species and subspecies of mammal.  The critically endangered Greater Monkey-faced Bat was named after him, Pteralopex flanneryi, when it was described in 2005.  Tim's pioneering research and conservation work in Melanesia also prompted Sir David Attenborough to describe him as being "in the league of the world's all-time great explorers".